Canadian First World War
Internment Recognition Fund

Fonds canadien de reconnaissance de l'internement durant
la première guerre mondiale


News & Events

Events


For all Armistice Films, 2017-2018 Festival & Event Screenings click here.


YOU ARE INVITED:
Rocky Mountain Premiere of
That Never Happened Canada's First National Internment Operations

Friday, November 17, 2017 from 6:15 PM - 10:00 PM | Buy Tickets Now

You're Invited to experience Banff like you've never experienced it before at the Rocky Mountain Premiere & Reception for "That Never Happened".

On the site of the former internment Camp at Cave and Basin. Between 1914 and 1920 over 8500 people were wrongfully imprisoned in Canada. Many were imprisoned in this location. The Banff Cave and Basin museum is featured in the documentary and will be both a spectacularly beautiful and eerie setting for the multi-award winning Documentary.

The Rocky Mountain Premiere will be an intimate, star-studded and VIP event hosted by Armistice Films Inc. and The Canadian First World War Internment Operation Recognition Fund, with Dignitaries in attendance.

Meet the Director Ryan Boyko, Producer Diana Cofini and key Protagonists of the film, which has taken home critical acclaim as well as People's Choice awards from across North America!

This will be a very special and unique evening with the Screening followed by a Q&A and an elegant wine and cheese reception. Spaces are limited.

6:15 pm Doors Open
7:00 pm Welcome & Screening
8:20 pm Talk Back with Director Ryan Boyko, Producer Diana Cofini & Protagonist Andrew Hladyshevsky
8:40 pm Reception of Wine and Cheese Begins (museum open at this time)
10:00 pm Bus departure (buses to be confirmed based upon requests)

Calgary pick up location CYM Hall: 409 9 Ave NE, Calgary, AB T2E 0V9

Cave and Basin National Historic Site
311 Cave Avenue (Map)
Banff, AB T0L 0C0

Buy Tickets Now





BOOK LAUNCH OF NO FREE MAN: CANADA, THE GREAT WAR, AND THE ENEMY ALIEN EXPERIENCE BY DR. BOHDAN S. KORDAN

The book launch of Bohdan Kordan’s No Free Man: Canada, the Great War, and the Enemy Alien Experience will take place at the Ukrainian Federation Hall, 405 Ave, Fairmount O, Montreal, QC on Thursday, March 23rd at 7:00 pm. The launch is part of a national speaking tour that will include presentations in Toronto, Montreal, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Calgary, Victoria, and Ottawa. 

Approximately 8,000 Canadian civilians were imprisoned during the First World War because of their ethnic ties to German, Austria-Hungary, and other enemy nations. Although not as well-known as the later internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War, these incarcerations played a crucial role in shaping debates about Canadian citizenship, diversity, and loyalty. Tracing the evolution and consequences of Canadian government policy towards immigrants of enemy nationality, No Free Man is a nuanced work that acknowledges both the challenges faced by the Government of Canada as well as the experiences of internees and their families.

Bohdan Kordan gives particular attention to the ways in which the political and legal status of enemy subjects configured the policy and practice of internment and how this process – magnified by the challenges of the war – affected the broader concerns of public order and national security. Placing the issue of internment within the wider context of community and belonging, Kordan further delves into the ways in which wartime turbulence and anxieties moulded public attitudes towards the treatment of enemy aliens. He concludes that Canada’s leadership failed to protect immigrants of enemy origin during a period of intense suspicion, conflict, and crisis. Framed by questions about government rights, responsibilities, and obligations, and based on extensive archival research, No Free Man provides a systematic and thoughtful account of Canadian government policy towards enemy aliens during the First World War.

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This project was funded by a grant from the Endowment Council
of the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund.

About CFWWIRF
The Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund (CFWWIRF) was established to support projects that commemorate and recognize the experiences of all of the ethno-cultural communities affected by Canada’s first national internment operations of 1914 to 1920.

For more information on the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund contact the Program Manager, Andrea Malysh, toll free at 1-866-288-7931.






BOOK LAUNCH OF NO FREE MAN: CANADA, THE GREAT WAR, AND THE ENEMY ALIEN EXPERIENCE BY DR. BOHDAN S. KORDAN

The book launch of Bohdan Kordan’s No Free Man: Canada, the Great War, and the Enemy Alien Experience will take place at THE CANADIAN MUSEUM FOR HUMAN RIGHTS, 85 ISRAEL ASPER WAY, Winnipeg, MB on Thursday, February 23rd,  7:00pm. The launch is part of a national speaking tour that will include presentations in Toronto, Montreal, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Victoria, and Ottawa. 

Approximately 8,000 Canadian civilians were imprisoned during the First World War because of their ethnic ties to German, Austria-Hungary, and other enemy nations. Although not as well-known as the later internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War, these incarcerations played a crucial role in shaping debates about Canadian citizenship, diversity, and loyalty. Tracing the evolution and consequences of Canadian government policy towards immigrants of enemy nationality, No Free Man is a nuanced work that acknowledges both the challenges faced by the Government of Canada as well as the experiences of internees and their families.

Bohdan Kordan gives particular attention to the ways in which the political and legal status of enemy subjects configured the policy and practice of internment and how this process – magnified by the challenges of the war – affected the broader concerns of public order and national security. Placing the issue of internment within the wider context of community and belonging, Kordan further delves into the ways in which wartime turbulence and anxieties moulded public attitudes towards the treatment of enemy aliens. He concludes that Canada’s leadership failed to protect immigrants of enemy origin during a period of intense suspicion, conflict, and crisis. Framed by questions about government rights, responsibilities, and obligations, and based on extensive archival research, No Free Man provides a systematic and thoughtful account of Canadian government policy towards enemy aliens during the First World War.

This project was funded by a grant from the Endowment Council of the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund.









 
 
June 25, 2016 at 11:00am
Monashee Mountain Plaque Unveiling

 
 
November 20, 7:00pm
Laurier House National Historic Site
Unveiling of Bust of Sir Wilfrid Laurier in Honor for his Defense of Civil Liberties in Wartime

Click here to for full details (PDF).
 
 
Saturday October 24, 2015
Symposium on WW I Internment and Official Unveiling of Statue
 
 
For Immediate Release – December 16, 2014
STAMPS COMMEMORATING 100th ANNIVERSARY OF CANADA'S FIRST INTERNMENT OPERATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
 
 
Call for Proposals – Civilian Internment in Canada: Histories and Legacies Winnipeg, June 17-19, 2015

Over the past four decades, the topic of wartime civilian internment in Canada has received considerable attention from scholars, activists, former internees, their descendants, and a host of others concerned with raising awareness and, in many instances, seeking redress. The result has been, among other outcomes, a dynamic body of information – both scholarly and popular.

Click here to read the full details (PDF).
 
 
Remarks of Prof. Bohdan Kordan, Prairie Centre for the Study of Ukrainian Heritage, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan at the official unveiling of the Eaton Internment Memorial Plaque, Hawker, Saskatchewan, 28 October 2014, 11:00 am.

Click here to download the entire address (PDF).
 
 

Please find below information on the upcoming internment symposium to be held on 17-18 October 2014 in Banff, Alberta.

 
 
 
 
Announcing CTO – The One Hundred Plaques Across Canada Initiative

To mark the 100th anniversary of Canada's first national internment operations of 1914-1920, the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Foundation (www.ucclf.ca) will be unveiling 100 plaques on Friday, 22 August 2014, the 100th anniversary of the War Measures Act.

This initiative, the CTO (“One Hundred”) project, enjoys the financial support of the UCCLF and of the Endowment Council of the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund (www.internmentcanada.ca).
All 100 plaques will be unveiled at 11 am (local time) in Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, German, and Hungarian churches and cultural centres, as well as in local and regional museums and other public venues, creating a "wave" of unveilings, moving from east to west, from coast to coast.

Dr Lubomyr Luciuk, the CTO project leader, said: "Beginning in 1994, the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association (www.uccla.ca) began placing historical markers to recall the internment operations, hoping to eventually have a plaque at each of the 24 camp sites. We started with Kingston's own Fort Henry, the location of Canada’s first permanent internment camp. Over the course of some 20 years our volunteers and supporters have made sure each internment camp location has been marked. The CTO project builds on UCCLA's foundational work. These plaques will hallow the memory of all of the victims of the internment operations and help educate our fellow Canadians about a little-known episode in Canada’s national history. That fulfils the mandate of the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund and of the UCCLF.

I want to add that this is the first time in Canadian history that any community has attempted to unveil 100 historical plaques from coast to coast at the same (local) time. This couldn’t happen without the enthusiastic support of hundreds of volunteers in 100 communities across the country, from Amherst, Nova Scotia to Nanaimo, British Columbia, and Grand Prairie, Alberta to Val D’Or, Quebec to name but a few. We’re also very grateful to our Patriarch, the two Metropolitans, the national executive of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, the representatives of the other affected communities and many of our internee descendants, for their help.

We’re calling on people to set aside 11 am (local time) on Friday, 22 August 2014 so that they can join us in witnessing a plaque unveiling in their own community or region. Be there to remember, and to learn."
 
 

"CTO" – RECALLING CANADA'S FIRST NATIONAL INTERNMENT OPERATIONS, 1914-1920 ONE HUNDRED PLAQUES RECIPIENT LIST
(as of 1 July 2014)

Click here to view the list of plaque sites.

 
 
Official Opening of Parks Canada's internment exhibitOfficial Opening of Parks Canada's internment exhibit:
ENEMY ALIENS, PRISONERS OF WAR:
CANADA'S FIRST WORLD WAR INTERNMENT OPERATIONS
1914 - 1920


 
 
Join author Barbara Sapergia for the Launch of Blood and Salt in Winnipeg at McNally Robinson Booksellers, at 7:30 pm on Thursday, May 9, 2013 in the Travel Alcove. Blood and Salt
 
 
Marsha Skrypuch, author and internee descendant will be giving a reading on internment at the Banff Public Library on June 19th at 7:30pm.

This event coincides with the official opening of the Parks Canada Internment Pavilion on 20 June 2013 at 2:00pm at the Cave & Basin National Historic Site, Banff National Park, Banff, Alberta.

For further information, click here (PDF) or contact 1-866-288-7931.
 
 
The Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund is now on Facebook.